£100k Burn Valley project under way

Contracts manager Keith Rattray of Cleveland Land Services pictured opposite the realligned Burn Valley beck.
Contracts manager Keith Rattray of Cleveland Land Services pictured opposite the realligned Burn Valley beck.
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WORK to remodel a popular Hartlepool park in a £100,000 project is underway.

Contractors have started work on the Burn Valley Gardens Back to Nature scheme which will see a range of improvements carried out.

The park’s beck is being re-aligned to create a new area of nature wetland and improve water flow during high rainfall.

All footpaths through the park are also being resurfaced to make it more accessible to the elderly and disabled.

High walls are being brought down in height to make Burn Valley feel more open and safe.

The project has been designed by Hartlepool Borough Council with input from local residents on the Friends of Burn Valley Gardens group.

Recent wet weather has slowed the work down but contractors say it is on course for completion around five weeks.

Keith Rattway, contracts manager with Cleveland Land Services, which is carrying out the work said: “It is a scheme that will benefit the park and is going to make it more accessible for everybody.

“In the past there has been problems with water backing up in Burn Valley but re-aligning the water course means the water should get into the system a lot quicker.

“We are also opening up the top end of the park to give more open views into the park and make people feel more at ease.

“The intention is to get more people to use the park and give it a nicer feel.”

The wall, separating Burn Valley Gardens from the neighbouring Burn Valley Family Wood, will be reduced in height from three feet to around a foot and surrounded by metal rail fencing to introduce more light into the park.

Part of the park is closed to the public while the work is being carried out.

The works are part of the Wild Green Spaces in Hartlepool project and are being funded by the National Lottery and the Environment Agency.