999 crews join forces to learn new lifesaving skills

WORKING TOGETHER: The fire and ambulance service at a road accident on the A689 in Hartlepool last month
WORKING TOGETHER: The fire and ambulance service at a road accident on the A689 in Hartlepool last month

FIREFIGHTERS are working with ambulance chiefs to gain new life-saving skills.

The paramedic-style training being provided is intended to equip firefighters to better treat casualties when they arrive at emergencies before an ambulance.

We are confident that this integrated approach will prove beneficial

Chris Chisholm, Cleveland Fire Brigade

The public have been assured the Immediate Care Programme is not designed to replace the need for paramedics but to provide a better overall service to the public.

Cleveland Fire Brigade has entered into an agreement with the North East Ambulance Service (NEAS) for the delivery of the medical training.

Project partners say it will allow firefighters to work alongside ambulance staff and provide the best possible pre-hospital care at emergencies they are called to.

Chris Chisholm, head of learning and development at Cleveland Fire Brigade, said: “This is the first time we have utilised our colleagues in NEAS to help us to deliver medical training to our operational crews.

“We are confident that this integrated approach will prove beneficial both in terms of joint working at scene as well as delivering a first class response to members of the public.”

Firefighters based at Hartlepool’s Stranton Fire Station are among staff who will receive the training.

An ambulance service spokesman “We look forward to working with our emergency colleagues at Cleveland Fire Brigade.

“NEAS also trains Cumbria Fire and Rescue Service, and Northumberland Fire and Rescue Service.

“We also wrote the nationally recognised Level 3 Certificate in Immediate Emergency Care for Fire and Rescue (QCF), and have a great deal of expertise in this particular field of training.”