‘Amazing’ Hartlepool boy, 8, saves grandad’s life

William Ingram (8) with his Granddad William Armour (64). Picture by FRANK REID

William Ingram (8) with his Granddad William Armour (64). Picture by FRANK REID

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A quick-thinking schoolboy has been hailed a hero after saving his grandad’s life when he suffered a stroke.

Eight-year-old William Ingram was staying at his grandad William Armour’s Alverstone Avenue home for the night when he fell ill.

William Ingram (8) with his Granddad William Armour (64). Picture by FRANK REID

William Ingram (8) with his Granddad William Armour (64). Picture by FRANK REID

When the youngster got up in the morning he noticed that the 64-year-old was slurring his speech and wasn’t well.

Quick-thinking William, a pupil at St Aidan’s C of E Memorial Primary School, immediately ran back to his mum Annette Armour’s home where she called for paramedics, who arrived within six minutes.

Mr Armour was immediately given medication and taken to University Hospital of North Tees in Stockton.

Now recovering at home alongside his wife Joyce Mitchell, 64, who he cares for, an emotional Mr Armour told the Mail: “If it wasn’t for William I wouldn’t be here now.

William Ingram (8) with his Granddad William Armour (64). Picture by FRANK REID

William Ingram (8) with his Granddad William Armour (64). Picture by FRANK REID

“I can’t thank him enough for what he did. He’s an amazing grandson.”

Following the shock incident, on December 10, kind-hearted William even attended school for the day.

“Since it happened a few people have never stopped mentioning it,” said Annette, 29, of Stratford Road in Hartlepool. “William said that his grandad just started slurring so he ran around the corner to my house so we could call the paramedics. They said that if it wasn’t for William raising the alarm he would not be here now with us.

“Thankfully they got there within five or six minutes and took him to North Tees.

William Ingram (8) with his Granddad William Armour (64) and mum Annette Armour (29). Picture by FRANK REID

William Ingram (8) with his Granddad William Armour (64) and mum Annette Armour (29). Picture by FRANK REID

“I know that will people suffering strokes, you only have a short time once they show the symptoms, so the staff managed to give him the right medication quickly.”

Despite the near-tragedy the family have been able to enjoy Christmas together as Mr Armour, who used to work at Lionweld Industrial before retirement, continues to recover. “He’s got most of his speech back and is recovering well,” added Ms Armour, who also has a daughter Sienna, three, with partner Wayne McKinley, 39.

“Now that dad’s OK we’ve all been saying how amazing a thing it is William has done.

“He gave me and my mam the best Christmas present possible.

“He’s a real star.”

The main stroke symptoms can be remembered with the word Fast: Face-Arms-Speech-Time.

Face – the face may have dropped on one side, the person may not be able to smile or their mouth or eye may have drooped.

Arms – the person suffering from a suspected stroke may not be able to lift both arms and keep them there because of arm weakness or numbness in one arm.

Speech – their speech may be slurred or garbled, or the person may not be able to talk at all despite appearing to be awake.

Time – it is time to dial 999 immediately if you notice any of these signs or symptoms.

• If you live with or care for somebody in a high-risk group, such as someone who is elderly or has diabetes or high blood pressure, being aware of the symptoms is even more important.