Bradley Lowery's delight at Grand National invite and visit from Jermain Defoe

The photo posted of Bradley Lowery with Sunderland player Jermain Defoe during his hospital visit.

The photo posted of Bradley Lowery with Sunderland player Jermain Defoe during his hospital visit.

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Bradley Lowery has been reunited with his 'best pal' after Sunderland and England star Jermain Defoe called in to see him.

The five-year-old from Blackhall Colliery is in Newcastle's Royal Victoria Infirmary as he under goes the next stage of his treatment for cancer.

He had been too ill to see him yesterday, when a visit was called off because he was in hospital suffering from a high temperature and pain.

He has returned to hospital for antibody treatment after his visit to London at the weekend, where he walked out onto the pitch at Wembley Stadium with Defoe as England took on Lithuania in a qualifier for the next World Cup.

Minutes into the game, the Sunderland striker stuck the back of the net with the first of his side's two goals, with the opposition failing to score during the match.

Today, the pair were together again as the player called in to wish him well - and there was an extra surprise for him too as he was invited to be a guest at the Grand National on Saturday, April 8, at Aintree.

His mum Gemma wrote on the Bradley Lowery's Fight Against Neuroblastoma Facebook page: "Bradley has still not been well today but he is a lot better than yesterday and he was cheered up off his friends popping to see him and giving him some lovely presents.

"He also had a huge smile on his face when I told him he has been invited to the Grand National thanks to the sponsors Randox.

"Bradley loves horses and is looking forward to going.

"Mammy loves getting dressed up so it's a win win."

Sunderland's stopper Vito Mannone has also posted a picture holding goodies ready to give to Bradley in days to come.

Bradley is under going the special treatment in a bid to give him as much time as possible after doctors found his neuroblastoma cancer was still growing, despite gruelling treatment.