DCSIMG

CATS visit has students purring

Ken Smith, from Industry Nature Conservation Association, with pupils Alfie Bingham, Bethany Oliver and�Eve Mallinson

Ken Smith, from Industry Nature Conservation Association, with pupils Alfie Bingham, Bethany Oliver and�Eve Mallinson

A PROJECT about water culminated in a day out for a group of Hartlepool schoolchildren.

Pupils from Years 4 and 5 at St Joseph’s RC Primary School learned about the relationship between nature and industry when they teamed up with experts from BP CATS based at Seal Sands.

Their visit to the Seal Sands plant formed part of the Children Challenging Industry (CCI) project which is co-ordinated by the Chemical Industry Education Centre at the University of York and hosted in the Tees Valley by the North-East Process Industry Cluster.

The project aims to improve primary schools’ perceptions of the chemical industry through science activities in the classroom which then lead to a visit to a local company. Tricia Paterson, a teacher at St Joseph’s, said 30 children visited BP CATS and it brought to life the lessons they learned in the classroom.

She added: “It was a great finale to the project. Having looked at how different industries use water, how to make pipes water tight, how to purify water through filtration and how to cool water, they were then able to see all of this happening in a working environment.”

BP CATS’ process engineer Craig Wreglesworth told the young visitors where oil and gas came from.

The pupils were then taken to the terminal’s wildlife sanctuary by Ken Smith from the Industry Nature Conservation Association.

They learned how the reed beds that overlook part of the Tees estuary provide a natural habitat for visiting birds and other wildlife but also filter water used by the plant, removing impurities created by the process.

Year 5 pupil Abigail Webb said: “It was great to see lots of nature among the industry. I was really surprised.”

Oscar Lupton, from Year 4, said: “The BP industry is more efficient than expected and I learned a lot about the terminal and the industry.”

Jim Sullivan, asset operating manager at BP CATS, said: “It’s great to be able to show the youngsters how industry and nature can live in harmony and that the product we supply is essential to all our needs.”

 
 
 

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