Drainage work off to a tee at Seaton Carew Golf Club

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AN engineering company is expanding its growing portfolio after being taken on by a golf club to maintain its course.

Town firm C&A Pumps and Engineering has been contracted to manage the irrigation system at Seaton Carew Golf Club.

The partnership came about after the company was called out on an unrelated electrical emergency.

And because so few companies in the region have the expertise to manage the complex irrigation system, C & A Pumps is now an approved Toro contractor – one of the main manufacturers of irrigation systems in the UK – and has also won work with Wynyard and Rockliffe Hall.

Managing director Alan Roberts said his firm had never really thought about pursuing this particular market and it was really by chance that the initial work at Seaton Carew came about.

He said: “They were keen to work with someone locally who could maintain their irrigation system so if anything did go wrong it could be resolved quickly and efficiently.

“And because so few companies in the region offer this service, we have quickly secured other work on the back of it. Being an approved Toro contractor is massive too; there are around 80 golf courses in the North East so there’s huge potential for us to cement ourselves as the company to go to for this type of specialist work.”

The irrigation system at Seaton Carew was installed in the 1970s but in recent years has been improved and is now run using the golf club’s own water borehole, which was installed in 2007.

Club groundsman Tony Cartwright said: “We’d used a few different companies in the past but none of them were local so as well as the cost of the job and the time it would take to get them on site, we also had travelling and even overnight expenses to pay.

“They’re doing such a good job for us. They’re reliable and if we have a problem, they can respond immediately. That’s so important for us as the course is built on sand so having the irrigation system working properly is vital to the upkeep of it.

“People don’t want to come and putt on dry, yellow greens, they want them to be lush and healthy.”