Engineers of future meet the experts

ENGINEERING TASK: Left to right, Alan Buckton and Ken Porteous (both Sembcorp), students Patrick Fannan, Srinidhi Krishnamoorthy, Maxine Winn and Matthew Rogan, Stuart Lax (Sembcorp) and (kneeling with back to camera) student Daniel Smyth
ENGINEERING TASK: Left to right, Alan Buckton and Ken Porteous (both Sembcorp), students Patrick Fannan, Srinidhi Krishnamoorthy, Maxine Winn and Matthew Rogan, Stuart Lax (Sembcorp) and (kneeling with back to camera) student Daniel Smyth

MEET a group of Hartlepool students who could be engineers of the future.

This group of enthusiastc youngsters joined forces with staff from Tees Valley-based Sembcorp to share their top quality engineering expertise.

Engineers Alan Buckton, Ken Porteous and Stuart Lax helped judge a variety of student projects at a celebration and assessment day held at Newcastle University.

The event, sponsored by the Engineering Development Trust (EDT), is aimed at inspiring the engineers, scientists and technologists of the future and attracted entries from around 250 students belonging to 50 schools and sixth form colleges throughout the north east.

Engineers from some of the biggest names in manufacturing including Nissan, Siemens and Shell take part in the scheme nationally each year and give up their time voluntarily to support the youngsters with engineering projects.

Sembcorp’s Wilton International-based engineers have helped youngsters at English Martyrs Sixth Form College in Hartlepool with two challenges over the last six months. Both were formerly presented to judges at the Newcastle event.

The first project involved students creating a thermoelectric generator while a second team devised a mechanism to detect steam trap failures within trench pipework.

Mr Porteous said: “We are always delighted to be involved. It’s a fantastic and prestigious event and something we’ve supported for many years.

“It’s all about enthusing youngsters and helping them to overcome the challenges that engineering inevitably throws up. At the same time they get real life exposure to industry, business and higher education and it really helps young people make informed choices about their futures. Many go on to have excellent careers within engineering.”