Hopes to create thousands of jobs with campaign to cut carbon emissions across Teesside

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A jobs-boosting campaign to make the Tees Valley a world leader on carbon reduction was being launched today.

Four firms from across the Tees Valley, including Billingham-based fertiliser producer GrowHow, have published a blueprint for a shared Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) network.

This is not just a blueprint for a prosperous Tees Valley, it is a blueprint that has the potential to change both the UK and European industrial landscape and its impact on the environment

Stephen Catchpole

The group is known as the Teesside Collective. Their aim is to:

• Set up Europe’s first industrial carbon capture and storage network.

• Cut Teesside’s annual carbon dioxide emissions by a quarter from 2024, helping retain 5,900 jobs.

• Create around 2,600 new jobs under plans to store 15m tonnes of carbon dioxide.

By 2024, 2.8m tonnes of carbon dioxide a year - a quarter of Teesside’s emissions - could be stored permanently under the North Sea.

Campaigners envisage that other industries in the Tees Valley would later be able to plug into the network.

Speaking at the Westminster launch of the project, Lord Bourne, Energy and Climate Change Minister, said: “What Teesside Collective is doing goes hand in hand with this Government’s ambition to upskill the workforce and support thousands of jobs in the North.”

Stephen Catchpole, managing director of Tees Valley Unlimited, said: “This is not just a blueprint for a prosperous Tees Valley, it is a blueprint that has the potential to change both the UK and European industrial landscape and its impact on the environment.”

The aim of the Teesside Collective companies is to capture emissions, plug them into a pipeline network, and permanently store them under the North Sea.