Jobs in industry could be the key for Hartlepool’s female students

(let to right) Molly Marshall (English Martyrs School), Esha Ashraf (Dame Allan's School), Lucy Grazler (St. Hilds School) and Abbie Waggett (Manor Academy) as the take part in the Pretty Curious event held at Hartlepool Power Station. Photograph by FRANK REID

(let to right) Molly Marshall (English Martyrs School), Esha Ashraf (Dame Allan's School), Lucy Grazler (St. Hilds School) and Abbie Waggett (Manor Academy) as the take part in the Pretty Curious event held at Hartlepool Power Station. Photograph by FRANK REID

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Twenty teenagers gathered at a power station to find out more about careers in science and engineering.

EDF Energy, the owners of Hartlepool’s power station, invited female students from Manor Community Academy, English Martys School and Sixth Form College, St Hilds Church of England School in Hartlepool and Dame Allan’s School, Newcastle.

Mari Louise Maley (English Martyrs School) working with power station reactor desk engineer Nicola Hooper as she takes part in the Pretty Curious event  at Hartlepool Power Station.

Mari Louise Maley (English Martyrs School) working with power station reactor desk engineer Nicola Hooper as she takes part in the Pretty Curious event at Hartlepool Power Station.

They worked in groups to create a life-size ‘smart’ bedroom or home improvements using littleBits electronic kits.

They also met female engineers who talked about their careers and how they found their way into the industry.

Power station training manager Danny Tyrrell said he hoped it showed the girls that they can pursue a career in engineering, science and technology in the future – “hopefully here at Hartlepool.”

The event was part of a programme called ‘#PrettyCurious’ which aims to;

This workshop showed the girls how to use technology to bring their ideas to life, and they had some great ideas from feeding pets while on holidays and a ‘smart’ wardrobe which chooses their day’s outfits

Danny Tyrell, power station training manager

l change teenage girls’ perceptions of STEM, science, technology, engineering and maths;

l inspire them to pursue science-based careers;

l and address the critical under-representation of women working in STEM.

Siobhan Bradshaw, science teacher at Manor Academy, said: “It is very we important that schools also make science and technology relevant to pupils, to show science being used in the world.

“We talk about Formula 1’s use of technology and days like today also bring home that message, especially when they get to meet female engineers working at Hartlepool.

“It shows them that science and technology can be careers for them.”