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Our hero – Dad who saved 100 lives is the Pride of Hartlepool

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ULTIMATE hero Aaron Collins has collected an ultra-special honour to mark the dramatic day when he saved 100 lives.

A night of true heroes saw 11 people pick up trophies at the Pride of Hartlepool awards last night.

But the man who brought the audience to their feet at the end of it all was Bombardier Collins, the Hartlepool man who saved the lives of 100 soldiers after a suicide car bomber drove into an Army compound setting off more than 20 explosives.

He collected the Editor’s Choice award for fighting off the Taliban while armed with just a pistol.

After he collected his honour, in front of an audience of more than 200 people at the Hardwick Hall Hotel in Sedgefield, the humble hero told the Mail: “He collected his honour, in front of an audience of more than 200 people at the Hardwick Hall Hotel, in Sedgefield. The humble hero dedicated the trophy to his colleague - Lance Corporal Jamie Webb, 21 - who died the day after the attack.

He said: “It was a million to one chance it was me. I was just doing my job.

“I am accepting this in memory of Jamie but I would like to think that anyone would have done what I did that day.”

Aaron, who has a partner Kirby Miller, 28, and a three year old daughter Sophie Collins, added:”I am proud of what I did and I am overwhelmed to win the Editor’s Choice award.”

It was back in March 2013, that the 25-year-old found himself trapped underneath the collapsed rubble with Taliban soldiers shooting at him from just 10 metres away.

Brave Bombardier Collins, of the 4th Regiment Royal Artillery, managed to free himself from the debris inside the destroyed army control room and single-handedly set about helping his trapped colleagues while fighting off the firing Taliban.

The former High Tunstall College of Science student then managed to call for armoured helicopters and, maintaining a cool head in a scene of utter chaos, directed them to the attacking Taliban soldiers.

In recognition of his brave life-saving efforts Bombardier Collins of the 4th Regiment Royal Artillery had already been awarded a Goschen Medal.

Now, he has been recognised as a winner in his home town.

It was back in March 2013, that the 25-year-old found himself trapped underneath the collapsed rubble with Taliban soldiers shooting at him from just 10 metres away.

Brave Bombardier Collins, of the 4th Regiment Royal Artillery, managed to free himself from the debris inside the destroyed army control room and single-handedly set about helping his trapped colleagues while fighting off the firing Taliban.

The former High Tunstall College of Science student then managed to call for armoured helicopters and, maintaining a cool head in a scene of utter chaos, directed them to the attacking Taliban soldiers.

In recognition of his brave life-saving efforts Bombardier Collins of the 4th Regiment Royal Artillery had already been awarded a Goschen Medal.

Now, he has been recognised as a winner in his home town.

But Bombardier Collins’ story was only one of the many moments of drama and emotion at the awards.

 

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