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Burglar who swiped Xbox from sister’s home ‘not bothered’ about prison sentence

Jonathan McGarry

Jonathan McGarry

A BURGLAR who stole a computer games console from his sister’s house has been jailed.

Jonathan McGarry, 33, swiped the Xbox 360 and three games belonging to the woman’s children from her house in Everett Street, Hartlepool.

He was jailed for 20 months at Teesside Crown Court this week after he admitted the burglary on November 19 last year.

The value of his haul came to £230. The court heard he believed he was owed more than £300 by his sister.

Just two days earlier McGarry made off with a laptop computer from a supported living complex in Middlesbrough where he had been living.

He took the black Dell computer belonging to Abbeyfield along with £253 in cash after entering a building he was not authorised to go in.

McGarry, of no fixed abode, pleaded guilty to two counts of burglary.

His lawyer Andrew McGloin said McGarry committed the burglary at his sister’s because he believed £350 had been taken out of his bank account.

Mr McGloin said McGarry has learning difficulties which affect his decision making.

He said McGarry had not had a permanent address since the age of 15 and had previously lived in a tent or stayed with friends and relatives.

A sentencing report by the probation service said he was not sorry about what his done and would rather be sent to prison.

In sentencing, Judge Peter Bowers said the theft from his supported living home was “particularly mean” as they had provided him with accommodation.

Judge Bowers said McGarry had “bitten the hand that fed him” adding: “Whatever the rights and wrongs about the money, your sister didn’t deserve a burglary.

“You said you were not sorry for your behaviour.

“You describe feeling bad about what you had done, but told the probation officer you planned both offences, knowing you risked your liberty, but you were not bothered.

“You made it clear what you wanted was a period in custody.”

 

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