People urged to have their say on rural crime

Police and Crime Commissioner for Cleveland, Barry Coppinger.
Police and Crime Commissioner for Cleveland, Barry Coppinger.

People can have their say as part of the largest ever survey into crime and anti-social behaviour in rural areas.

The survey, launched by the National Rural Crime Network (NRCN), is calling for people who work or live in rural areas to come forward and give their views on policing in their community, the impact crime and anti-social behaviour has on them and their neighbours and to ultimately help shape the future of crime prevention and rural policing.

This survey will give the police and other partner agencies a vital insight into what the issues are and how we can better tackle them together

Barry Coppinger

Anyone living or working in rural areas is being encouraged to take part in the survey.

Against a backdrop of policing budget reductions and a growing focus on higher crime areas, the new survey will assess how crime and anti-social behaviour, as well as the threat of potential crime, affects individuals, both financially and emotionally.

It will also shed light on the human implications of crime and the fear of crime seeking to explore the impact not just on individual victims, but also communities as a whole. Traditional farm-related incidents such as fuel theft and sheep rustling make up just one part of the problem and organisers say they need to understand all the other issues that affect people in rural areas. 

Police and Crime Commissioner for Cleveland, Barry Coppinger said: “As chair of the Tees Rural Crime Forum I have been out to visit farmers across the area and understand the stress that dealing with crime and anti-social behaviour can have on them and their families, together with the detrimental effect on their livelihood.

“This survey will give the police and other partner agencies a vital insight into what the issues are and how we can better tackle them together.”

The survey, which is taking place with support from the Home Office, aims to build a body of information to improve national awareness of crime in rural areas as well as provide a clearer picture of attitudes towards crime to help inform government and local policy. It runs until Wednesday, June 24, at www.nationalruralcrimenetwork.net/survey?member=Cleveland