Disney in the great outdoors

Tony Davison reading a Disney Book at the Boulder Park at Summerhill. Picture by FRANK REID
Tony Davison reading a Disney Book at the Boulder Park at Summerhill. Picture by FRANK REID
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UNDERNEATH the acres of rolling grounds at Summerhill lies the Old Catcote Village.

It is now just a matter of days until Mail readers can get their hands on the fourth book in the Wonderful World of Knowledge collection.

People can find out just how much life has changed over the last half a million years when they get their copy of the next title, From Stone Age To Space Age.

Ahead of the release, Mail reporter Dominic Shaw spoke to Tony Davison, the co-ordinator at Summerhill, who explained why people enjoy learning about their own heritage.

UNDERNEATH the acres of rolling grounds at Summerhill lies the Old Catcote Village.

Life has changed a lot since the Bronze Age. But Tony Davison said people’s interest in their heritage has never worn thin.

“I always say that for people to understand what life is like today they have to have a perspective of their history.” he said.

“And the history here in Hartlepool is quite fascinating.”

As part of his role at Summerhill, Tony involves youngsters in a scheme called Healthy Heritage.

He explains: “We get the children to look at current issues of today and then to take a step back and to think of what their fore-fathers would have had to do in the same situation.

“We look at the way they lived, their homes, their clothes, their relationships.

“The children really enjoy it, they can relate to it, especially when it is their home town they are finding out about.”

Mail readers can find out how life has changed throughout the world when Mickey, Minnie and Co return next week with the next book in the magical Disney series.

The usual colourful and jam-packed title tells how civilisation began, how empires were built and how the world has become what it is today.

Tony added: “Sometimes when people think of history they automatically think it has to be hundreds or thousands of years old, but that is not necessarily so.

“History can be 40 or 50-years-old and children can learn about things which their parents used to be enjoy when they were kids.

“I think it’s the same with everything. If you teach the youngsters in a fun and interesting way they enjoy it.

“These books look great, full of facts which I think youngsters of a varied age will enjoy reading about.”

The book is available to readers for just £2.99 with tokens available in the Mail.