Board game is anything but square

Shown with the new boardgame are St Hilds headteacher Colin Reid(centre) with Reverend Chris Collison of St Hilda's Church and Ray Simpson(right) Founding Guardian of the international Community of Aidan and Hilda with pupils (left to right) Leonie Stabler,  Lisa Westmoreland, Grace Purnell and Martha Monaghan-Kennedy.
Shown with the new boardgame are St Hilds headteacher Colin Reid(centre) with Reverend Chris Collison of St Hilda's Church and Ray Simpson(right) Founding Guardian of the international Community of Aidan and Hilda with pupils (left to right) Leonie Stabler, Lisa Westmoreland, Grace Purnell and Martha Monaghan-Kennedy.

STUDENTS have proved they have all the right moves when it comes to learning about their school’s namesake.

Nine student librarians at St Hild’s C of E Secondary School, in Hartlepool, have created a board game about the life and times of St Hild.

The game was created to celebrate St Hild’s Day last Tuesday and was launched with a visit from Reverend Chris Collison, of St Hilda’s Church, and Ray Simpson, who was visiting from Lindisfarne and is an author of various books on Celtic spirituality and modern Christian living, including a novel on St Hilda, which Hild later became known as.

The launch of the game kicks off a year of celebrations in the run up to St Hilda’s 1,400th birthday next year.

The idea behind the Snakes and Ladders-inspired game is that four counters represent players and they travel across numbered squares on the board, representing the community that St Hild travelled through.

At the top of the board is a perspex model of Whitby Abbey, St Hild’s final destination.

Players must throw two dice – one representing a question card, with subjects such as the Lindisfarne Gospels, the Anglo-Saxons and other Saints of the North, and another showing the number of moves to make on the board.

If a player gets the question right, they win a jewel, representing St Hild’s links to royalty.

The first person to reach the steps of Whitby Abbey stops the game, and the player with the most jewels is the winner.

School library resources co-ordinator Debra Bulley, who worked on the year-long project with the students and former school librarian Kim Horton, said: “It’s an educational board game to enlighten us about St Hild and her life.

“The engineering, technology and graphics departments helped us to create the game.

“I’m so proud of our students, they have worked their little socks off.”