Lessons of survival – Dyke House pupils create own ‘world’ based on modern-day challenges

Dyke House Sports and Technology College English teacher Andrea McManus (left) and Project Leader Daniela Cesarano with pupils lucy Brown, Nathan Chawner, Courtney Littlewood, Tyler Dawes, Natasha Proffitt, Tamsyn Kerr, Jasmin Imisson, Luke Sowerby, Tobin Dawes, Amy Turnbull, Sophie Burn-McCrossan, Owen Newbury and Pauline Flounders.
Dyke House Sports and Technology College English teacher Andrea McManus (left) and Project Leader Daniela Cesarano with pupils lucy Brown, Nathan Chawner, Courtney Littlewood, Tyler Dawes, Natasha Proffitt, Tamsyn Kerr, Jasmin Imisson, Luke Sowerby, Tobin Dawes, Amy Turnbull, Sophie Burn-McCrossan, Owen Newbury and Pauline Flounders.

YOUNGSTERS at a Hartlepool school completed a deep-thinking challenge to create their own ‘world’ - work from which they proudly presented to their parents.

Year 7 students at Dyke House College of Technology were tasked with a project called ‘What Do People Really need?’ as part of a learning programme called Youville.

Dyke House pupils at the careers fair

Dyke House pupils at the careers fair

The pupils were asked to imagine creating their own world, and to gain an understanding of what is needed to promote a positive society and ensure their citizens are fulfilled and valued.

Youville saw them explore and investigate real-world problems and challenges, such as human rights issues.

They then wrote their findings into a “Book of Basics” which included writing about how to be a good leader and citizen, and important lessons of survival.

Dyke House teacher and project leader, Daniela Cesarano, said: “Project-based learning helps students to explore challenging issues and develop 21st century skills within and beyond the classroom.

Dyke House Sports and Technology College pupils (left to right) Pauline Flounders, Sophie Burn-McCrosson and Amy Turnbull with their work on a display stand behind them

Dyke House Sports and Technology College pupils (left to right) Pauline Flounders, Sophie Burn-McCrosson and Amy Turnbull with their work on a display stand behind them

“Youville presents them with complex problems where they learn to overcome obstacles and rise to every challenge.”

As part of the project students were required to grow their own food, and to serve their cooked creations to members of the local community at The Annexe, in Wharton Terrace hartlepool.

And they worked with Alex Lockwood – a journalist and senior lecturer from Sunderland University - who helped them to research and write about human rights issues across the globe.

This week students staged a presentation and exhibition showcasing their learning journey and beautiful work to parents, staff, governors and members of the local community.

Amy Turnbull proud of her design

Amy Turnbull proud of her design

One student, Owen Newbury, said: “We had to do critique as well as redrafts. We did plenty of redrafts which was really great, and made our work even better and helped us learn. It was great fun, we all really enjoyed it.”

Following the exhibition, the students will move onto phase two of the project – looking beyond basic needs to an exploration of how to create a sense of belonging for their citizens.