The world of wizardry comes to Hartlepool

Pupils Emily Barnard, of English Martys, Pelo Vanzyl, English Martys, Lucy Booth, Kingsley primary school, Odin Thorpe, Kingsley primary school with Simon Parsons, station director at Hartlepool power station, and the science performers Phil Bell-Young and Ginny Smith.
Pupils Emily Barnard, of English Martys, Pelo Vanzyl, English Martys, Lucy Booth, Kingsley primary school, Odin Thorpe, Kingsley primary school with Simon Parsons, station director at Hartlepool power station, and the science performers Phil Bell-Young and Ginny Smith.

The secrets behind magic tricks were shown to fascinated students in Hartlepool.

And it wasn’t just magic which came under scrutiny at two LabLive shows in town - an insight into how the brain works was also given when Hartlepool power station teamed up with Cheltenham Science Festivals.

A spectacular part of LabLive.

A spectacular part of LabLive.

The LabLive events were held at the Borough Hall and saw more than 700 pupils learn about neurons and levitation.

The show was designed to inspire young pupils to study science, technology, engineering and maths and engage inquisitive young minds.

Simon Parsons, station director at Hartlepool power station, said: “Supporting education is really important to us here at the power station and EDF Energy in general, and the opportunity to be part of Cheltenham Science Festival is a significant part of us reaching out in to the wider community.”

Phil Bell-Young delved into the science of the wizarding world. Children were also invited onto the stage to create potions to make their very own gummy worms and learn about levitation from magnetic levitation and air pressure.

Supporting education is really important to us here at the power station and EDF Energy in general, and the opportunity to be part of Cheltenham Science Festival is a significant part of us reaching out in to the wider community

Simon Parsons

Ginny Smith showed the audience how the brain communicates with the rest of the body. The pupils created a giant ‘neuron’ live onstage and explored how nerve cells send messages through the brain and body.

The biggest cheer of the day was when Ginny used electricity generated from the tensing muscles of a student to control the movement of a teacher’s hand.

Sharron Pearson, Education Manager for Cheltenham Festivals said: “Our aim is to inspire and engage pupils into considering careers in STEM.

“We hope the pupils and their teachers enjoyed the spectacular science shows. We had a superb team of EDF volunteers and staff from the Borough Hall who all made sure all pupils enjoyed the experience and had some fun!”

Students have fun at the science day.

Students have fun at the science day.

Phil said: “From when I was little, science has been my whole world.”

He added: “Inspiring people and getting them to use their imagination is the best thing about it. If we can just inspire one of the children to ask a question then that’s the most important aspect.”

The audience at the science event.

The audience at the science event.

Using electricity to control movement.

Using electricity to control movement.