Exciting finds of Roman remains

Archaeology work going on close to Greatham Creek as part of Environment Agency project.
Archaeology work going on close to Greatham Creek as part of Environment Agency project.

THE remains of an unknown Roman settlement on Greatham’s doorstep have been hailed as exciting by a parish leader.

Historical finds from the Bronze and Iron Age have been unearthed by archaeologists during work on a new wildlife habitat at Greatham Creek.

The Environment Agency, which is leading the work, said the discovery is significant because they are the first such remains ever to be found next to the salt marsh on the north bank of the Tees Estuary.

Brian Walker, chairman of Greatham Parish Council, said the discovery shed new light on Greatham’s past.

An open event takes place from 3pm-7pm today at Greatham Community Centre where people can look at the finds which include fragments of pottery, an arrowhead and jewellery.

Councillor Walker said: “They have had a wonderful archaeological discovery and I think it’s very exciting.

“They have taken the history of Greatham back over a thousand years in one fell swoop.

“I’m looking forward to going to see what they have found at the community centre.”

Other finds uncovered at the site include flint thumbnail scrapers, Bronze Age blades, ancient burial mounds and the remains of several Roman roundhouses.

The Environment Agency did not expect to find anything of significance on the eland when they carried out a survey.

But contractors Birse got a surprise when they started digging.

The project at Greatham Creek will remove barriers allowing the area to become tidal again and benefit wildlife.