Expert advice on driving safely in the snow

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EXPERTS have warned drivers to take extra care as Britain prepares to face its worst weather of the winter.

Darron Burness, head of the AA’s severe weather team, said: “As we have seen in the States this week, the weather is changeable and hard to predict, so keep tuned to local radio for the weather and travel updates.

“The wind could cause the snow to drift, leading to some pretty horrible and potentially treacherous driving conditions.

“Allow extra time for your journey and heed any police advice about whether it’s safe to travel - you may need to delay your journey.

“If there is snow where you are, clear it off your car’s windows, lights and roof before leaving and try to stick to the main roads where possible - better to have a longer journey than risk getting stuck.

“Gentle manoeuvres are the key to safe driving on snow and ice and leave a much bigger gap between you and the vehicle in front.

“The wind will also make it feel bitterly cold, so at the very least take lots of warm layers, fully-charged mobile, road atlas, and make sure your car has at least a quarter of a tank of fuel in case of unexpected delays.”

RAC spokesman Simon Williams said: “This winter’s yo-yo style weather continues - relatively mild, wet and blustery one week, cold with snow and ice for some the next.

“The message to drivers is to plan ahead - perform some quick and easy checks on the condition of your vehicle, such as tyres and windscreen wipers, as soon as possible.

“Then, when out on the road, be on your guard, responding to the rapidly changing conditions and adjusting your driving style as necessary.”

In Scotland, forecasters said more than 2in (5cm) could accumulate at lower levels by this morning, with more than 6in (15cm) on high ground, prompting Police Scotland to issue travel advice to motorists.

Chief Inspector Louise Blakelock said: “There is a risk of localised disruption to travel likely and we would ask motorists to take precautions before they set off.”