Hartlepool fire fighters to deal with ambulance calls to help under-pressure paramedics

Pictured at the launch of the Emergency Medical Response Trail at Tyne & Wear Fire and Rescue Service HQ Barmston Mere, Washington are Keith Wanley of Durham and Darlington Fire & rescue, Ian Haytor of Cleveland Fire & Rescue Service, Gareth Campbell Asst. Operations Manager Ambulance Service, Chris Lowther Tyne & Wear Fire Service and Mark McCarthy of Northumberland Fire Service.

Pictured at the launch of the Emergency Medical Response Trail at Tyne & Wear Fire and Rescue Service HQ Barmston Mere, Washington are Keith Wanley of Durham and Darlington Fire & rescue, Ian Haytor of Cleveland Fire & Rescue Service, Gareth Campbell Asst. Operations Manager Ambulance Service, Chris Lowther Tyne & Wear Fire Service and Mark McCarthy of Northumberland Fire Service.

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People in Hartlepool could soon see a fire engine turn up to deal with a medical emergency.

The town is going to be one of the areas phased into a new pilot scheme which sees the North East Ambulance Service join forces with four fire brigades in the region, Cleveland Fire Brigade, Northumberland Fire and Rescue, County Durham and Darlington Fire and Rescue Service and Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue Service.

The six-month trial, which starts this month, will see firefighters become Emergency Medical Responders, EMRs, despatched to medical emergencies, such as a cardiac arrest, along with the paramedics.

Ian Hayton, Chief Fire Officer for Cleveland Fire Brigade, who is heading up the co-responding project, said fire stations are based in communities, which means the EMRs can often be on the scene quicker than the paramedics and in an emergency every second counts.

He said: “The scheme involves trained firefighters attending incidents in areas where we can reach a casualty and maintain life or reduce suffering and anxiety until a paramedic arrives.

“This really is a lifesaving partnership.”

Caroline Thurlbeck, director of the North East Ambulance Service, said: “NEAS receives a new 999 call every 65 seconds, and in an emergency, every second counts.

“Our ambition for this trial is to improve the survival rate for those people who suffer from a life-threatening illness or injury in the community.”

Firefighters have undergone additional training for the new role.