Hartlepool’s HMS Trincomalee celebrates its 200th birthday

A Hartlepool landmark has celebrated its 200th birthday.

Britain’s oldest warship still afloat the HMS Trincomalee, berthed at the The National Museum of the Royal Navy Hartlepool, celebrated the milestone yesterday.

The Mayor of Hartlepool, Councillor Paul Beck, on the deck of HMS Trincomalee with, left to right, Abanne Waters, Feroz Wadia and Blair Southern.

The Mayor of Hartlepool, Councillor Paul Beck, on the deck of HMS Trincomalee with, left to right, Abanne Waters, Feroz Wadia and Blair Southern.

The celebration, which took place at the museum at Jacksons Dock in Hartlepool, marked the bicentenary since the ship was built in Mumbai, India, in 1817.

Friends of HMS Trincomalee came together along with the Mayor of Hartlepool, Coun Paul Beck and descendants of the vessel’s builders, to honour the momentous occasion.

This year also marks 30 years since HMS Trincomalee docked at Jackson Dock, which forms part of The National Museum of the Royal Navy’s historic fleet, alongside Nelson’s flagship HMS Victory, submarine HMS Alliance and Belfast’s First World War survivor HMS Caroline.

HMS Trincomalee, which is still afloat at the museum, is one of the region’s top attractions, and brings more than 50,000 visitors each year to the town. This year alone has seen an additional 11,500 visitors to its site.

The Mayor of Hartlepool Councillor Paul Beck with Lord Eric Saumarez.

The Mayor of Hartlepool Councillor Paul Beck with Lord Eric Saumarez.

Mayor of Hartlepool, Coun Paul Beck said he was delighted to be able to honour the anniversary.
He said: “I am absolutely thrilled to be here at this celebration.

“The HMS Trincomalee is so important to this town and important to our tourism industry and to the businesses around the marina, adding to their income.

“The Royal Naval Museum here in Hartlepool has been a fantastic achievement and I know there is a lot of jealousy around the country who would love to have this facility.

“We as a local authority are determined to get behind the Royal Naval Museum and make it a fantastic success for years to come.”

The Mayor of Hartlepool Councillor Paul Beck on the deck of HMS Trincomalee with Mary Montgomery, who is a direct descendant of Elsza Bunt, who kept a diary during the voyage of HMS Trincomalee during his return to England.

The Mayor of Hartlepool Councillor Paul Beck on the deck of HMS Trincomalee with Mary Montgomery, who is a direct descendant of Elsza Bunt, who kept a diary during the voyage of HMS Trincomalee during his return to England.

Lord Eric de Saumarez, the President of the Friends of HMS Trincomalee, added: “I am delighted to be here, so few ships have floated for 200 years, it is a real achievement and a tribute to the standard of restoration.”

More than £500,000 has been invested this year in the maintenance and conservation of the ship, which is the sole-surviving link with the 19th Century Bombay shipyards.

In addition, over the last 22 years, more than £5m has been received through various Lottery-funded projects to maintain HMS Trincomalee, which has contributed to Tees Valley and Hartlepool’s leisure economies.

Further improvements and required maintenance works have been scheduled, including a further £250,000 investment and completed crowdfunding campaigns helping to restore HMS Trincomalee’s rediscovered head and the launch of a new, educational activity zone for families.

(left to right) Feroz Wadia, Abanne Waters, and Blair Southern who are all related each other and have has former master builders of HMS Trincomalee in their Picture by FRANK REID

(left to right) Feroz Wadia, Abanne Waters, and Blair Southern who are all related each other and have has former master builders of HMS Trincomalee in their Picture by FRANK REID

Roslyn Adamson, general manager at The National Museum of the Royal Navy Hartlepool, said: “HMS Trincomalee is one of the region’s key landmarks and visitor attractions, and we are fortunate to have her on our doorstep.

“She has contributed a great deal to the Tees Valley and Hartlepool’s economic wellbeing for the past 30 years, as she continues to welcome thousands of visitors each year.

“It is important to recognise her bicentenary and historical standing as Britain’s oldest warship still afloat. 
“The public have played a key role in helping to secure funding through donations, together with the support of The National Museum of the Royal Navy, and we are hoping this will continue so more people can enjoy her rich heritage, as well as attract more people to the North East and Hartlepool.”

The Mayor of Hartlepool Councillor Paul Backs (centre left) is photographed at the cutting of the 200th birthday cake for HMS Trincomalee. Picture by FRANK REID

The Mayor of Hartlepool Councillor Paul Backs (centre left) is photographed at the cutting of the 200th birthday cake for HMS Trincomalee. Picture by FRANK REID