Hartlepool students’ Harry Potter world record bid

Pupils listening to JK Rowling read during the record attempt on National Book Day held at High Tunstall College of Science. Photograph by FRANK REID

Pupils listening to JK Rowling read during the record attempt on National Book Day held at High Tunstall College of Science. Photograph by FRANK REID

0
Have your say

Students were all ears when they took part in a world record attempt.

Pupils at Hartlepool’s High Tunstall College of Science joined schools up and down the country trying to break the record for Largest Reading Lesson Across Multiple Venues.

They were all very excited to take part in such a special event

Jan Burton, higher level teaching assistant

A total of 146 Year 7 High Tunstall pupils took part in the activity which was held to celebrate National Book Day.

The current record stands at 3,509 students and 75 schools took part across the country.

The school is waiting to hear if they were successful in setting a new record.

The attempt involved the pupils listening to Harry Potter author JK Rowling reading the first chapter of The Deathly Hallows over the internet, followed by teachers reading the second chapter for 30 minutes.

Jan Burton, higher level teaching assistant, said: “All the schools were participating at the same time, doing the same thing. The evidence is then collated and sent to the Guinness Book team.

“It was a huge success for our students as they were all very excited to take part in such a special event.

“They behaved impeccably, from the enthusiastic countdown to the start to the wholehearted immersion into the Harry Potter story.

“They are very hopeful to see their record in the 2017 edition of the Guinness Book of World Records, although they will receive Guinness World Record certificates and 100 free books for the school. They are very proud of themselves: they were a credit to the school.”

The attempt had to be verified by independent witnesses, photos and a covering letter from headteacher Mark Tilling whose ideas it was.