IVF baby has her own child

Mohamed Menabawey, Elodie Meggs, Rachel Andrews and Bev Andrews
Mohamed Menabawey, Elodie Meggs, Rachel Andrews and Bev Andrews
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THIS is the enchanting moment a retired fertility consultant met his “IVF granddaughter”.

If it had not been for Mohamed Menabawey, neither tiny Elodie Eve Meggs nor her mum Rachel Andrews would have existed.

Retired IVF doctor Mohamed Menabawey has met Elodie Meggs, the baby he is now calling his his first IVF grandchild. Elodie with her mother Rachel Andrews, who was born through IVF, and grandmother Bev Andrews, along with Dr Menabawey.

Retired IVF doctor Mohamed Menabawey has met Elodie Meggs, the baby he is now calling his his first IVF grandchild. Elodie with her mother Rachel Andrews, who was born through IVF, and grandmother Bev Andrews, along with Dr Menabawey.

Mr Menabawey is a retired IVF consultant who spent more than 20 years helping Hartlepool and East Durham couples have the children they longed for.

One miracle “baby” was Hartlepool girl Rachel Andrews, who came into the world on June 13, 1994.

Rachel’s parents Bev, now 52, and Dave Andrews, now a 49-year-old tanker driver, endured a six-year wait for their precious bundle, before IVF under pioneering Mr Menabawey was successful.

So it was a heartwarming scene when Rachel, 20, took her own tiny baby, two-week-old Elodie, along to meet the “miracle man” for the first time.

Bev, who chaired the town’s Fertility Information Reproduction Support Team (FIRST), said: “It was so exciting, because he was so excited to meet her.

“The first thing he said was ‘I’m a grandfather again’.

“He has just become a grandfather to two boys, but he said ‘she’s now my IVF grandaughter’.”

Little Elodie, whose dad is 28-year-old Benjamin Meggs, was born naturally at the University Hospital of North Tees, in Stockton, on August 31, weighing 8lb 11oz.

Bev already had two children, Jennifer Duthie, now 32, and Christopher Andrews, 30, from a previous marriage, but she wanted to give Dave a child.

But she had developed endometriosis and was told she could not have any more children.

However, after she and Dave moved back to Hartlepool, having lived on Army barracks in Aldershot, she was delighted to be placed under the care of Mr Menabawey.

“The doctors down south said ‘you couldn’t be going to a better place’, said Bev, from Bilsdale Road in Seaton Carew.

“‘If anyone can help you get pregnant, it’s Mr Menabawey’, they said.”

Bev developed problems in pregnancy, including hyperstimulation, a serious consequence of IVF.

She was told she was having triplets, as well as Rachel, but only Rachel survived, and after a full-term pregnancy was born healthy at Hartlepool General Hospital.

Bev said back then, IVF was a “taboo” subject, and as far as she knew, only one boy and two sets of twins had been conceived this way in Hartlepool.

She added that she classes Mr Menabawey as the family’s “fairy godfather”, as he also helped her daughter Jennifer when she suffered endometriosis as a teen.

The Mail reported in 2008 how the consultant took the unusual step of inducing the menopause in Jennifer at 15 to cure her condition.

Incredibly, she then fell pregnant naturally and is now mum to two boys, Oliver, seven and, five-year-old Benjamin.

And Mr Menabaway has also been there for Bev when she was diagnosed with a brain tumour five years ago, and when she found a tumour in her neck the previous year.

Rachel, a social work student at Teesside University, said: “It’s just really nice for him to meet Elodie.

“We really appreciate everything he has done for the family.”