Historic battery gets rare gun

The folks at the Heugh Gun Battery have taken delivery of a second world war artillery gun. Pictured with it, clockwise from bottom left, are: David Gibson, Allen Jones and Bill Bond. *NOTE Sorry there's no upright, it just didn't work as one and the gun was hemmed in to a tight space.
The folks at the Heugh Gun Battery have taken delivery of a second world war artillery gun. Pictured with it, clockwise from bottom left, are: David Gibson, Allen Jones and Bill Bond. *NOTE Sorry there's no upright, it just didn't work as one and the gun was hemmed in to a tight space.
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A HISTORIC museum has added to its growing arsenal of military memorabilia after taking delivery of a rare World War Two gun.

The Heugh Battery, on Hartlepool’s Headland, has welcomed the arrival of a 1936 artillery gun.

Only 1,000 of the machines were ever made, and museum chiefs believe it is the only one of its kind in the country.

John Southcott, chairman of the Battery, said: “As far as we are aware it is the only one around.

“There aren’t any in the south so we have got the only one.

“They only made about a thousand and took them to France where most got captured by the Germans or left behind at Dunkirk. Some also went to the desert.

“It is marvellous that we are allowed to look after it.”

Its last home was the Woolwich Museum of Royal Artillery Fire Power in London where it had been kept in storage.

John added: “Like all museums they are short of room and after discussions we finally managed to secure it for Hartlepool.

“It is a very important piece and shows how the artillery guns developed between the first and second world wars.”

The weapon stopped being used by the Army in 1941 when it was superseded by the more powerful 25 pounder guns.

The battery in Moor Terrace has now amassed a collection totalling 40 heavy guns and barrels along with along with scores of other smaller artefacts from wartime.

The delivery comes just weeks after a 1950s Bofors anti-aircraft gun took pride of place at the museum.

The weapon was dedicated to all ranks of Royal Air Force Regiment members and was officially accepted during a poignant service.

Visitors can see the new addition which goes on display this weekend.

The battery closes to the public for the winter next Friday.