History of Hartlepool group’s efforts to replace park’s Boer War tribute

Ward Jackson Park. Hartlepool
Ward Jackson Park. Hartlepool
5
Have your say

A statue honouring Hartlepool’s contribution to the Boer War could be reinstated in a town park after almost 50 years.

The History of Hartlepool group is spearheading efforts to bring back the statue of a soldier to Ward Jackson Park.

Ward Jackson Park's Boer War statue after its rifle was stolen.

Ward Jackson Park's Boer War statue after its rifle was stolen.

The original bronze figure was stolen in 1968 leaving only a trace of its boots.

Its plinth, which lists the 320 men from the Hartlepool area who fought in the conflict and 23 who died in battle, is all that remains.

On Friday, Hartlepool Borough Council’s Regeneration Services Committee will be asked to support the history group’s efforts for a new statue.

A report of Denise Ogden, director of regeneration and neighbourhoods, states: “The construction of a new statue would return this element of the park to its former glory and to remember the townsfolk who fought in, and perished, in this conflict.

The construction of a new statue would return this element of the park to its former glory and to remember the townsfolk who fought in, and perished, in this conflict

Council report

“At the moment there are numerous options to be explored and more extensive investigation is required before the project can move forward.”

The committee will consider three options.

The first is for a new statue to be created by artist Ray Lonsdale using metals with a low scrap value and using the existing plinth with built in security posts. A second option is to explore creating a full-size 3D printed statue, measuring 6ft 2in, using the original maquette from the Museum of Hartlepool’s collection.

A third proposal is to replace the statue with an exact copy of the original statue.

The original statue was unveiled in the park in 1905 after being designed and made by local sculptor FW Doyle Jones to commemorate the Boer War.

The conflict took place in South Africa between 1899-1902.

Sadly, the statue’s rifle was stolen early in 1968 before the whole thing disappeared later that year.

Councillors will discuss the project when it meets at 9.30am in the Civic Centre, Victoria Road, on Friday, September 9.

The meeting is open to the public.