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Should the Government’s heavily-opposed health reforms be scrapped?

Health Secretary Andrew Lansley has defended the Government’s controversial health Bill after the main medical unions became the latest bodies to declare all-out opposition to the reforms.

The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) and the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) have called for the Bill to be scrapped.

It follows a move by the British Medical Association (BMA) in December to also fully oppose the Health and Social Care Bill, currently going through Parliament.

The RCN, the biggest nursing union, said “serious concerns” have not been addressed during the parliamentary process, listening exercise or political engagement and the Bill will not deliver on the principles originally set out.

Recent announcements such as the rise in the cap on private patients being treated in NHS hospitals to almost half (49%) “make the Bill in its entirety a serious threat to the NHS”, it said.

But Mr Lansley today backed the reforms, telling BBC Breakfast the opposition to the Bill was more about issues of pay and pensions.

Today we ask, Should the Government’s heavily-opposed health reforms be scrapped?