People urged to speak up over noisy neighbours

Noisy neighbours make life a misery for some people. Now Hartlepool people have somewhere to turn.
Noisy neighbours make life a misery for some people. Now Hartlepool people have somewhere to turn.

Dozens of Hartlepool people have lodged complaints about rowdy parties and loud music.

And there’s still a chance for even more town residents to do the same thanks to a service which clamps down on noise nuisance.

Our message to Hartlepool residents is that noise can carry some distance, particularly at night, and that you can have a good time without making your neighbours’ lives a misery

Sylvia Pinkney, head of public protection at Hartlepool Borough Council

A late-night call-out service, which is run by Hartlepool Borough Council, is receiving plenty of calls.

It operates from 10pm on Fridays and Saturdays until 3am the next day throughout the summer. The service will stop at 3am on Sunday, August 30.

Residents can call a dedicated mobile telephone number – 07789 921338 – to report loud music, rowdy parties and other noise-related problems. A

nd as latest figures show, plenty of people have taken up the chance to make a report.

The service received 103 calls in 2014 and so far this summer it has already received 74 calls.

Head of Public Protection Sylvia Pinkney said: “Most of the complaints we have received have been about one-off incidents such as loud music at parties that environmental health staff have been able to resolve informally.

“However, we have served three abatement notices and the purpose of these notices is to inform individuals of the nature of the problem and indicate what action must be taken to correct it, and notify them of the consequences of non compliance.

“Our message to Hartlepool residents is that noise can carry some distance, particularly at night, and that you can have a good time without making your neighbours’ lives a misery.”

When a complaint is received, council officers initially assess the extent of a problem before deciding whether further action is required.

Where a complaint is felt to be justified, people are asked to reduce the amount of noise they are making.

And those who do not bring down their noise levels after being requested to can be served with an abatement notice.

The council also has the power to seize music equipment, while the ultimate sanction is prosecution at a magistrates’ court under the 1990 Environmental Protection Act. Conviction can result in a fine of up to £5,000.