Schools building bridges with India

St Bega's pupils Leah Bromby and Mohid Rizwan hold a tree to be planted in the school garden by (left to right) Andrew Ruffell, Mohanakrishnan Gayathri Devi, Rajendran Govindasamy, St Bega's head teacher Mike Cooney and Subhashini Gurumurthy
St Bega's pupils Leah Bromby and Mohid Rizwan hold a tree to be planted in the school garden by (left to right) Andrew Ruffell, Mohanakrishnan Gayathri Devi, Rajendran Govindasamy, St Bega's head teacher Mike Cooney and Subhashini Gurumurthy

A GROUP of teachers from India paid a flying visit to Hartlepool as part of a cultural exchange visit.

The teachers are visiting schools in town to forge closer links with the UK and to build greater cultural understanding amongst young people and their teachers.

The teachers met colleagues from their UK partner schools for the first time to plan joint projects that they and their students will work on as part of the British Council Connecting Classrooms programme.

As part of their trip to Hartlepool, they met teachers from across town at St Bega’s RC Primary School, in Thorpe Street, Hartlepool, and helped plant a tree in the school grounds to mark their visit.

Partnership co-coordinator John Coley, of High Tunstall College of Science, said: “We are very excited about this wonderful opportunity to broaden our students’ understanding of other cultures.

“We want to establish our students as responsible global citizens who possess an international outlook.

“In today’s global economy it is vital that students are equipped with linguistic skills, cultural awareness and intercultural understanding and as teachers we are passionate about helping our students along this path.”

The visiting teachers also called into Manor College of Technology, Grange Primary School and Greatham Primary School.

They observed lessons, took part in assemblies and toured the schools as well as taking in some of the local tourist attractions.

Olga Stanojlovic, head of schools in education at the British Council, said: “It is more important than ever that we ensure our young people develop the skills and understanding they need to thrive in our global society.

“Working together through Connecting Classrooms will open young people’s eyes to what life is really like in other countries and show them that young people share many of the same hopes and aims the world over.”