Sensory delight at Hartlepool care home

Queens Meadow care home manager Julie Armstrong pictured with pensioners Ruby Bates and Dorothy Shaw(right) in the new sensory garden.
Queens Meadow care home manager Julie Armstrong pictured with pensioners Ruby Bates and Dorothy Shaw(right) in the new sensory garden.
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A NEW sensory garden at a Hartlepool care home has been officially unveiled to the delight of residents.

The new feature has been created at Queens Meadow Care Home, in Stockton Road, by Labour councillor Kaylee Sirs.

Staff say the new garden will give residents and their families a new outdoor environment designed to stimulate senses of smell, touch and sound.

The garden has been made possible thanks to the efforts of the home’s activities co-ordinator, who has secured grants from groups in the area in order to fund the new gardens.

The sensory garden has been part-funded by Labour councillors for the Foggy Furze ward, Coun Sirs and councillors Kevin Cranney and Christopher Akers-Belcher, who generously donated money from their ward budgets.

Bosses at the Hill Care care home say the garden is a great way for residents to keep mentally active when it comes to stimulating the senses.

Julie Armstrong, care home manager, said staff and residents are looking forward to the official opening and that the home was grateful to everybody who had made this ‘dream’ project possible.

Julie said: “Residents and visitors have already mentioned how tranquil the new sensory garden is and we’re sure it will be a great space for our residents to relax and enjoy themselves.

“Of course, as this is a sensory garden it is a great way to keep our residents mentally active when it comes to stimulating their senses.

“We feel that the sights and sounds of the new garden will be enjoyed by all and help further improve the relaxing environment we provide to our residents.”

The ribbon cutting ceremony was carried out yesterday afternoon by Coun Sirs, who represents the Foggy Furze ward on Hartlepool Borough Council.

Coun Sirs said: “We all wanted to contribute as we all recognise the benefits of the sensory garden for social inclusion.”