VIDEO: Matchstick men on show in Hartlepool

CHILDREN have joined forces with a craftwork company to produce a tribute to LS Lowry.

And now, the colourful creation has gone on show in a community garden at Hartlepool Marina.

Youngsters from Catcote School have been involved in a project alongside Martin Brown from Flaxton Street Wrought Iron Ltd to produce figures and buildings in the style of L.S. Lowry for the Community Garden at Hartlepool Marina.

Youngsters from Catcote School have been involved in a project alongside Martin Brown from Flaxton Street Wrought Iron Ltd to produce figures and buildings in the style of L.S. Lowry for the Community Garden at Hartlepool Marina.

It features moving figures which will turn in the wind - and it’s very much a green display which is expected to be there all summer.

Martin Brown, the owner of Flaxton Street Wrought Iron Ltd, helped to create the work along with Steve Nixon.

Martin said they had teamed up with children from Catcote School Business and Enterprise College after he approached the school to get involved. He added: “We have had the community garden for a while and done different projects there.

“We have worked with different schools and different people. Catcote School volunteered to help with the matchstick man. It is something which is nice and vibrant and should give people inspiration.”

The project is called An Inspiration Called Lowry and features sculptures made of papier mache, roofing felt and other recycled materials.

It features 25 matchstick men and buildings including factories, as well as a larger papier mache figure who represents Lowry himself.

Martin added: “We have done a tribute to Van Gogh before and we have done other works on wildflowers but this time we went for Lowry.”

Most of the figures are about four to eight inches tall but the one representing Lowry is “about the size of a small child,” said Martin.

“It is there to show Lowry sitting in the garden and sketching the scene around him.”

He said the exhibition would remain in the garden for probably the whole summer. “It will stay there for as long as it still looks okay and we are hoping that will be the whole summer.

“The idea is that the little men will turn in the wind because they are all on a single stem. It is an altering artwork.”

The garden was first set up as part of Hartlepool’s celebration of The Tall Ships Races.

Catcote teacher Wendy Wharton said children from the art club and year 9 got involved. She said: “The garden looks fantastic. I was amazed at how good it is. The children are very interested in the sensory side of things so this was a really good project for them to be involved in. It was creative and they got to use all sorts of materials.”