Vital research into breast cancer is welcomed by Hartlepool support group

Isobel Wilson of the Hartlepool Pansies group pictured with  St Hilds pupill Klaudia Robinson.
Isobel Wilson of the Hartlepool Pansies group pictured with St Hilds pupill Klaudia Robinson.
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THE most comprehensive review ever carried out into breast cancer research has been welcomed by the founder of a town support group.

Experts at the charity Breast Cancer Campaign, which commissioned the research, have identified 10 key areas where they say more study into the disease is needed.

The report warns that 180,000 women could die from breast cancer and 1.2million women could be diagnosed with the disease by 2030 unless action is taken over critical gaps in research.

The key areas research will be focused on includes the understanding of how genetic changes lead to the development of breast cancer and increasing the public understanding of how cancer can be prevented through diet and lifestyle.

Isobel Wilson, founder of Hartlepool breast cancer support group Pansies, is pleased the issues have been identified.

Isobel, 68, who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1996 but thankfully beat the disease, said: “It’s a good thing that these key areas have been identified.

“They can work to focus on those areas now to make sure these critical gaps don’t remain and that can only be a good thing for women who are diagnosed.

“What I hope it doesn’t do is give people who are suffering with breast cancer false hope, this research might take another 10 years yet.

“I hope women who are suffering with breast cancer don’t see that these key areas have been identified and think that it will be solved straight away.”

The report, titled Gap Analysis 2013, was developed by more than 100 scientists, clinicians and healthcare workers.

Breast Cancer Campaign has now formed an action plan which sets out how scientists, funding organisations and the Government can join forces to address the gaps. The charity aims to raise £100 million over the next decade to address the problems.

Isobel, who lives at Seaton Carew, added: “More people are getting diagnosed but more people are surviving.”