Ki’s proper day out at Wembley with Sunderland

Sung-Yueng Ki.
Sung-Yueng Ki.

KI SUNG-YUENG insists lifting the Capital One Cup this season would mean more to him than last, with Sunderland facing a “proper” Wembley final.

The South Korean was part of the Swansea side who thrashed then League Two outfit Bradford City 5-0 in the League Cup final 12 months ago, as the Welsh club lifted the first major trophy in their 102-year history.

But Ki will be firmly on the side of the underdogs this Sunday, as the Black Cats look to upset the odds against Premier League title contenders Manchester City.

If Sunderland can emerge victorious though, Ki says it will bring a far greater sense of achievement than when Swansea coasted to the trophy against the Bantams.

The on-loan Swans midfielder said: “It will be a totally different game to last year.

“Last season was quite easy against Bradford, but this time, it’s a proper final.

“If we win this game, there will be a better feeling than last year.

“Playing against Bradford compared to City is completely different. If we win, you get a lot more satisfaction.

“It’s a great honour to be at Wembley for the second year in a row.

“Everyone will be watching it and we just want to blow this game away.

“Sometimes the biggest teams lose against smaller teams – it happens.

“It doesn’t happen very often, but often enough for us to believe there’s no reason why we can’t win on cup final day.”

While Swansea had endured a century without silverware, it has been a lengthy wait on Wearside too, as Sunderland compete for their first trophy since 1973.

Ki realises opportunities like this weekend are rare, particularly as he was only three when Sunderland last participated in a major cup final.

And he is desperate for Gus Poyet’s side to go down in Sunderland folklore by lifting the cup.

“You don’t get this kind of chance very much,” he added.

“Everyone has a lot of desire to win it and for the fans as well.

“You don’t achieve these things easily. At Swansea, it took the club 100 years to win a trophy and it’s more than 40 here.

“Maybe if we win this one, fans will remember us for a long time.

“All the players know how big this is.

“I was born in 1989, they were last at a final in 1992.

“For the players and the fans it will be the same feeling, it’s a very proud moment to be at a final as a player and as a fan and we want to make something very special.

“Being in the final is great but beyond that, you want to do yourselves justice, to do well.”