HEALTH MATTERS: Delivering ‘sim babies’ and top results

SUCCESS THE SIM WAY: Student Rachel Sinclair who, along with her fellow trainees, delivered the first 'sim baby' to arrive at the North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust's hi-tech simulation suite
SUCCESS THE SIM WAY: Student Rachel Sinclair who, along with her fellow trainees, delivered the first 'sim baby' to arrive at the North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust's hi-tech simulation suite

STUDENTS at a health trust are delivering top results - and babies.

Third year medical students who are working in women’s health in the Tees Valley have successfully delivered the first ‘sim baby’ to arrive at the North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust’s simulation suite.

The achievement was made at a centre where the aim is to prepare staff for the reality of dealing with women in labour, and with a whole range of scenarios.

The suite’s first baby was delivered in a real time scenario by Rachel Sinclair (pictured left).

She did it with help from fellow students from Newcastle University and the whole event was organised by the trust’s resuscitation team.

Rachel was delighted at how she did and praised the centre for the way it provided education.

She said: “The simulation suite is an excellent resource for medical education as we are provided with the opportunity to learn crucial clinical skills in a safe, risk-free environment.

“The experience has made me feel more confident in my ability to assist in real life situations on the wards.”

Education and development facilitator Helen Sutherland said: “The session was very successful and will now be included as part of the women’s health rotation for all students.”

Helen explained how the facility was making a real difference to training at the North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust.

She said: “Use of the simulation suite enables the students to be involved in hands on care during labour and delivery and also management of obstetric emergencies.”

The simulation suite is based at the University Hospital of North Tees, and it allows clinical staff to learn by creating specific scenarios in a safe environment.

It includes mannequins of a sim-baby, a pregnant woman, two babies – a full term and a premature baby and a five year old child.

They are all operated from a remote laptop in an adjoining room.

Experts at the North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust say they are helping trainee doctors, newly qualified nurses and other staff be prepared for the real thing in the trust’s simulation suite. The models can mimic medical problems and can respond to treatments or drugs.

A spokesman for the North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust said: “It’s all about patient safety and being able to offer this leading edge training helps to improve people’s skills and make them more confident to deal with difficult situations and ultimately benefit patients.”