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Hopes for breakthrough in War of the Roses: Council chiefs to meet with villager over flower bed row

John Proudlock has been battling to save a flower border around his cottage since being ordered to remove it by Dalton Piercy Parish Council.
John Proudlock has been battling to save a flower border around his cottage since being ordered to remove it by Dalton Piercy Parish Council.

A flower battle could come to a rosy conclusion for a villager after a parish council opened the door for a compromise.

John Proudlock, of Rose Cottage, in Dalton Piercy, has been battling to save a flower border outside his cottage after Dalton Piercy Parish Council ordered it be removed.

John Proudlock said the council's decision had left his mother, Thelma Peppert, distressed.

John Proudlock said the council's decision had left his mother, Thelma Peppert, distressed.

Mr Proudlock said the council’s decision had caused his 93-year-old housebound mother, Thelma Peppert, considerable distress.

The parish council, though, insists it would like to meet with Mr Proudlock to come up with a resolution to suit all parties.

It comes after they said the flower border was part of the village green, and claimed it had grown bigger in size and could block access to a proposed new children’s play area near the cottage.

The council’s deputy chairman, Alan Timothy, said: “We will be writing to Mr Proudlock in the next few days.

I don’t know the detail of the council’s proposal yet, but I’m more than happy to seek some amicable resolution to it

John Proudlock

“We have allowed the garden to be in place since the beginning of time, and are happy for that to continue within some geographical limitations.

“We would like to meet with Mr Proudlock and agree what is allowable and what isn’t, which should have been done a long time ago.”

Mr Proudlock has welcomed the council’s stance.

He said: “I don’t know the detail of the council’s proposal yet, but I’m more than happy to seek some amicable resolution to it.

“The main problem I have is that the parish council are still trying to say I have extended the border, which is total nonsense.

“I have dozens of pictures from as far back as 1967 to show it hasn’t been extended by even a millimetre.

“The suggestion that the border is disrupting access to the village green is totally fictitious.

“I have already emailed the chairman of the parish council and the clerk to the parish council saying I was happy to have some sort of informal discussion with a view to reaching an amicable resolution.”

Mr Proudlock told the Mail last month that the flowers had been his mother’s pride and joy for 50 years.

Mr Timothy said at the time that a Land Registry tribunal brought by Mrs Peppert found in 2011 that the land was part of the village green and the flower border “constitutes a public nuisance”, but the council had allowed residents to maintain small features despite the ruling.