Seven ways to cope with aches and pains as you get older

Aches and pains can be a part of an active lifestyle and ageing.
Aches and pains can be a part of an active lifestyle and ageing.

Minor aches and pains can often be part of an active lifestyle and ageing, but it can affect your life on a daily basis.

Here’s seven suggestions to help make it easier.

Breathing

Breathing techniques can help to ease pain and sometimes symptoms. Aim for five or six breaths a minute to stimulate a ‘rest and restore’ response.

Keep a pain journal

Jotting down how activities make you feel each day is a good way to keep track for your GP or online doctor. You can record a ‘pain score’ between one and 10 and discuss your notes at a consultation.

Get plenty of sleep

Pain can be more severe in bed and leave you exhausted, but sleep deprivation can actually be a factor in worsening pain. Make sure you’re going to bed at a regular time and don’t take naps during the day.

Relaxation techniques

Stress can contribute to various types of pain, but you can help by doing relaxation exercises. For a simple mindfulness exercise, lie in a quiet room – make yourself fully aware of it and accept any sensations you may be feeling. your toes

Painkillers

While paracetamol can often be the go-to painkiller for long-term pain, you may be prescribed a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). It’s always best to chat with your GP or online doctor about their side effects if prescribed.

Stay active at work

Most of us spend around 10 hours a day sitting down, which isn’t great news for back and neck pain – try to take frequent breaks and stretch regularly.

Don't ignore it

Pain is the body’s way of letting you know that something is wrong, so don’t ignore it. Always talk through your symptoms with your local GP or online doctor.

:: Dr. Alexandra Phelan is a NHS GP and Online Doctor for Pharmacy2U. Manage your repeat prescriptions by going to www.pharmacy2u.co.uk/NHS or telephone 0800 031 9162