MPs are more likely to be caught speeding than anyone else

Monday, 15th April 2019, 1:59 pm
Updated Monday, 15th April 2019, 1:59 pm
MPs are more likely to have been caught speeding than anyone else (Photo: Shutterstock)

MPs are the most likely be caught speeding or have a driving conviction compared to any other profession, new statistics show.

The figures (from insurance comparison website GoCompare) show that more than one in five Members of Parliament have been caught speeding.

They also show that MPs are more likely to have a driving conviction of any sort when compared to other professions.

The analysis of more than 1,400 different careers also showed that psychoanalysts were the most likely to be caught using a device such as a mobile phone while behind the wheel.

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MPs and radio presenters speed the most

According to the research, 22.1 per cent of MPs have a speeding conviction, with several high profile examples such as Ed Balls and Chris Huhne making the front pages of newspapers in the past.

Radio presenters have the next highest proportion, with 19.2 per cent being slapped with a speeding conviction.

More than one in six sales directors, operations directors, managing directors and bailiffs have a speeding conviction, with surgeons and money brokers also high up on the list.

Medics more likely to be at fault

The research also looked at the most likely to make at-fault insurance claims, with those in the medical profession topping the list.

Seventeen per cent of paediatricians have made at-fault claims, with around one in seven GPs and psychiatrists having claimed too.

Could your profession affect how much you pay for insurance?

Lee Griffin, founding member of GoCompare, said, "Your occupation is one of the key considerations used to calculate the cost of your premium.

“Ultimately, different professions are deemed riskier than others, so the chances are, if you’re a footballer or a GP, you’re likely to face higher premiums than a priest."

This article originally appeared on our sister site, The Yorkshire Post