Hartlepool boss Ronnie Moore demands his side kill off teams rather than ‘wine and dine’ them

[HUFC - BLUE/WHITE]. Picture by JOE SPENCE
[HUFC - BLUE/WHITE]. Picture by JOE SPENCE

RONNIE Moore has demanded his side kill off teams rather than “wine and dine” them after watching one of the most one-sided matches he can remember.

The experienced Hartlepool United manager knows the points dropped at Bootham Crescent could prove vital after seeing York City scrap their way to a 1-0 win.

We wined and dine them but didn’t kill them off

Ronnie Moore

York played the entire second half with 10 men after Dave Winfield was sent off for a two-footed lunge on Brad Walker just before the break.

As you’d expect, Pools then dominated possession but failed to do enough to penetrate the York back line or test keeper Michael Ingham.

In the end a deflected Luke Summerfield strike proved enough to secure the home side a vital win.

A frustrated Moore told SportMail: “People say a point is no good but a point against 10-men, while it would still have been disappointing, could turn out to be really important.

“If you are not going to win, then make sure you don’t lose the game because if Tranmere draw at this present time, they go above us because of our goal difference.

“A single point can sometimes give you that little lift you need.

“It was a one-sided game, I haven’t seen a more one-sided game and I was sat there thinking they won’t score all day.

“But are we? That was the question.

“We threw three at them up top late on and that was a toss up between Scott [Fenwick] or Maz [Marlon Harewood].

“We went with Fenwick because he is a more natural goalscorer but we didn’t create anything for him.

“We wined and dined them but didn’t stick the knife in and killed them off.”

Pools were boosted that Jordan Hugill had been given the go-ahead to play despite concerns over an eye injury picked up in the Easter Monday defeat to Southend.

Moore added: “We got the news late Friday that Jordan was okay and that was pleasing but we didn’t play to his strengths.

“We had practised all week and we knew where their weaknesses are. We had to play the ball down the side of them but we didn’t do it often enough.

“Instead, it was too many square balls, knocked out wide.”