Hartlepool United defender Myles Anderson helps youngsters 'Find Their Brave' for Children's Mental Health Week.

Hartlepool United defender Myles Anderson visited Barnard Grove Primary School to deliver a talk on ‘Finding Your Brave’ as part of Children’s Mental Health Week.

Friday, 7th February 2020, 12:55 pm
Updated Friday, 7th February 2020, 1:15 pm
Hartlepool United defender Myles Anderson delivering a talk at Barnard Grove Primary School as part of Children’s Mental Health Week.

Anderson delivered an hour-long after-school talk to over 30 pupils and their parents discussing mental health.

Children’s Mental Health Week takes place 3rd-9th February and was founded to shine a spotlight on the importance of young people’s mental health – this year’s theme is ‘Find Your Brave’.

“Myles has played such an important role for us with this talk,” explained the school’s Well Being Lead Hilary Harmison.

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Hartlepool United defender Myles Anderson delivering a talk at Barnard Grove Primary School as part of Children’s Mental Health Week.

“Especially for some of our older boys, who are perhaps in danger of taking those wrong paths, it’s all about meeting and being given the chance to talk to role models.

“Some of our boys can have a front but we have talked with them about strategies to give them support when they are feeling a bit vulnerable.

“I am very aware that the club regularly champions the need to focus on mental health which is why I extended an invite to them, and anything like this that encourages our pupils to open up and interact about this important topic is really worthwhile.”

Anderson spoke about the times when he’s had to ‘find his brave’ both on and off the pitch and answered questions from those in attendance.

“It was a really good afternoon,” he told the club website.

“I was a bit apprehensive and anxious so I certainly had to ‘find my brave’ to go along but hopefully I have helped some of the young guys find theirs in some way as well.

“It was all about trying to help the children find their brave and, in football terms for me, that means getting stuck in and getting back up if you get knocked down.

“On the other side, being brave is about being able to say ‘okay, I might need help here’ and then being able to speak to your parents, your friends, your teachers and know that it’s fine to do that.

“I am really hoping that some of the guys feel encouraged to be able to do that moving forward.”