Mail readers reject a call for an end to use of isolation booths in schools

Mail readers have narrowly rejected a call for an end to the controversial use of so-called isolation booths in British schools.

Saturday, 18th January 2020, 8:07 pm
Updated Sunday, 19th January 2020, 3:14 pm
Mail readers have rejected calls for an end to use of so-called "isolation booths" for disruptive students in UK schools
Mail readers have rejected calls for an end to use of so-called "isolation booths" for disruptive students in UK schools

With concern growing that an increasing use of the booths for disruptive students could have serious effects on young people's mental health, we asked if their use should be stopped.

More than 250 people voted, with 47% saying yes and 53% no.

Readers commenting on on our Facebook page wanted to see an end to the practice.

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Karl Schut wanted to see schools doing more to keep pupils engaged with their lessons and said the use of isolation booths should be banned: “Yes, it's a school not a prison,” he wrote.“I think a lot of behaviour problems would be sorted if school was more flexible. What's the point in teaching kids subjects they'll never pass and that they hate?“Work with colleges to get less academic kids learning something they're interested in that's more useful.

“Not everyone needs a french/history/science GCSE.”

And Carly Wilson-Palmer argued: “Solitary confinement is a punishment used in prison. It shouldn't be adopted to schools, even if it is a lesser form.”

Dolium Aemulor had little time for the education system as a whole and write: “May have been George Orwell who said school is merely a form of installing discipline and compliance to the government system ....basically a means of brainwashing kids to do what they’re told and to respect authority and never question what the government tells them.”