FEELING GREAT: Knowing what is best to wear on your feet when walking

Summer nights, warm weather and it is one of the most perfect times of the year to get out and enjoy the fresh air and the sights of your town.

By The Newsroom
Thursday, 28th July 2022, 12:00 am
"Let’s make sure you know everything you need to know about it to protect yourself as best you can."
"Let’s make sure you know everything you need to know about it to protect yourself as best you can."

Where better than along the coastline or sea front and I’ve seen plenty of people out and about of late.

Now walking appears to be a really safe way to keep fit and active and you’d be forgiven for thinking you’re being kind to your knees by doing it regularly.

However, there are a few things that you should know and understand about walking to make sure your ramble is as enjoyable, as healthy and as comfortable as possible.

So here goes: how strong and flexible your lower back is will affect how painful your knees become if you’re a regular walker.

Also important is the surface you walk or run on, such as a hard or uneven surface, or a soft piece of grass.

There’s also the factor that most people don’t know about: what you choose to wear on your feet.

We are regularly offering advice and expertise on this subject to patients visiting the Paul Gough Physio Rooms, so let’s make sure you know everything you need to know about it to protect yourself as best you can.

OK, if you enjoy a gentle evening stroll while chatting with a friend, then a simple pair of cushioned trainers will do.

But be careful with your choice as some plimsoll-style trainers offer very little support for your ankles and feet and will mean that your knee joint is likely to be moving around a little too much.

If that happens, your knee bones will rub together, causing the wear and tear to increase and you’ll never know it’s even happening, at least not until you see some swelling or feel heat coming from your knee.

Your knee is under added stress if your footwear isn’t protecting it by absorbing some shock from the pavement and keeping it in a steady position.

A similar thing can happen if you wear flip-flops or sandals.

They may be fashionable, but this is a particular problem for ladies right now who choose to swap their high heels for lighter sandals.

Don’t be surprised if after wearing flat sandals all day, you suddenly develop a pain in and around the back of your ankle.

If you do, it’s a good sign that you’ve irritated your Achilles tendon – which can be a long-term problem that many ladies suffer from daily.