Hartlepool power station boss confident despite Brexit nuclear treaty withdrawal

The boss of Hartlepool Power Station says he is confident a replacement to Europe's nuclear regulator will be secured after Brexit.

Wednesday, 3rd January 2018, 5:00 am
Power station director Craig Dohring at the controls.

The UK is currently part of the European Atomic Energy Community, also known as Euratom, which allows the free movement of nuclear workers and materials between European Union member states.

Britain is due to leave Euratom as part of the Brexit process as it comes under the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice which Prime Minister Theresa May has committed to removing the United Kingdom from.

Minister at the Department for Exiting the European Union, Steve Baker (left) with Craig Dohring station director at Hartlepool Power Station, during the minister's visit in September

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Last May, the Commons Energy Committee urged the UK to delay leaving Europe’s nuclear regulator warning power supplies could be threatened if a new regulator was not in place.

But Craig Dohring, station manager of Hartlepool’s EDF nuclear power station, is more optimistic.

He told the Mail: “It is clear there is a few things we need to have a replacement for including Euratom.

“We need something to essentially cover us to a similar level of our Euratom agreement which allows us access into Europe and third part countries to support the power station around some nuclear specific equipment and fuel.

Minister at the Department for Exiting the European Union, Steve Baker (left) with Craig Dohring station director at Hartlepool Power Station, during the minister's visit in September

“I’m confident we will get that. There is a positive feeling around the Government trying to cover that.

“I think our role is to help the Government and provide information and advice, and the Government have certainly been open to that.”

The power station spoke about the issue with MP Steve Baker, one of four Brexit ministers, when he visited Hartlepool in September.

Mr Baker then said the Government had “some work to do” and its job was to get new legislation through to ensure the success of nuclear power stations across the country.

Mr Dohring added: “It was great to have the opportunity to speak to him and show him how we operate and where Hartlepool Power Station sits in the local community.”

The Euratom treaty was set up in 1957 and established a ‘nuclear common market’.

The UK has been part of it since joining the then European Economic Community in 1973.