Here is a preview of what the Apollo Pavilion in Peterlee will look like during arts programme tonight and tomorrow night

This is what an iconic landmark will look like for the next two nights as part of a programme to celebrate its 50th birthday.

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the creation of Victor Pasmore’s iconic Apollo Pavilion in Peterlee, Artichoke, the UK’s leading producer of art in the public realm, have commissioned Berlin-based collective of artists and architects Mader Wiermann to create an installation that will reflect the Brutalist architecture of the Pavilion.

Preview of what the Apollo Pavilion will look like tonight during art project to celebrate its 50th anniversary.

Preview of what the Apollo Pavilion will look like tonight during art project to celebrate its 50th anniversary.

Taking place tonight and tomorrow night, from 6pm-9.30pm, the installation has been commissioned by Durham County Council and launches a year-long programme of community activity and engagement celebrating the anniversary of the Apollo Pavilion and 100 years since the founding of the German Bauhaus School of Art.

The Pavilion remains a rare UK example of a large-scale experiment in the synthesis of art and architecture.

Named after the Apollo moon landing it represents a bold vision and modernist optimism which underpinned the architecture of Britain's New Towns.

Pasmore was also influenced by the theory of form developed by Bauhaus artists such as Josef Albers.

Preview of what the Apollo Pavilion will look like tonight during art project to celebrate its 50th anniversary.

Preview of what the Apollo Pavilion will look like tonight during art project to celebrate its 50th anniversary.

Mader Wiermann will transform the brutalist facade of the Pavilion with a light and video mapping installation, celebrating these three major sources of inspiration which artist Victor Pasmore drew on when designing the structure.

The installation will allude to the moon landings with projections of the shadow of the Apollo landing shuttle.

The installation will also incorporate monochrome geometric patterns, which reflect the Bauhaus style, and out of these bold lines will emerge amorphic forms which evoke the paintings of Victor Pasmore and will temporarily transform the Pavilion into a moving, flowing structure.