Record number of runners complete ‘most brutal half-marathon in the North East’

A record number of runners completed ‘the most brutal half-marathon in the North East’.

By Gavin Ledwith
Sunday, 16 June, 2019, 16:26
Runners taking part in the Durham Coastal Half Marathon arriving at Crimdon Picture by FRANK REID

Around 440 competitors took part in the annual National Trust Durham Coast Half Marathon from Seaham to Crimdon Dene.

The 13.1 mile trail course included muddy clifftop paths, steep ascents and descents plus around 350 steps to negotiate.

Among the places the course passed through were Hawthorn Dene, Easington Colliery, Castle Eden Dene, Blackhall Colliery and Blackhall Rocks.

Organiser Wayne Appleton, a ranger with the National Trust, said afterwards: “It went brilliantly. The sun shone although there were plenty of muddy patches along the course from the rain earlier in the week to keep the runners happy.

“We had 440 people take part, which is the most we have had in seven years since the race started, and so many of them stayed around at the end to have a drink and a picnic.”

Mr Appleton said the event has already established itself as a runners’ favourite on the trail circuit and that it would definitely return in 2020.

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Runners taking part in the Durham Coastal Half Marathon arriving at Crimdon Picture by FRANK REID

He added: “I would get lynched if I turned around and said it was not happening next year.

“It has a reputation as the most brutal half marathon in the North East and we’ve even got it on the T-shirt this year.”

Every competitor finished the course, which started at Nose’s Point car park and finished near Crimdon Pony World, with three needing minor treatment for blisters.

All profits from the race will go directly to the National Trust’s work in caring for the local coast and countryside.

Runners taking part in the Durham Coastal Half Marathon arriving at Crimdon Picture by FRANK REID
Runners taking part in the Durham Coastal Half Marathon arriving at Crimdon Picture by FRANK REID