This is the big impact Brexit could have on Middlesbrough and Leeds United's finances and transfers

The United Kingdom has exited the European Union – but what could it mean for Middlesbrough?

Sunday, 2nd February 2020, 2:06 pm
How Brexit could affect Middlesbrough

Following the General Election, the UK have now left the customs union – and here’s what it come mean for Boro and fellow clubs throughout the EFL:

TRANSFERS

Brexit will naturally affect transfers, especially when it comes to Boro trying to sign players from overseas.

Sign up to our daily newsletter

The i newsletter cut through the noise

Without free movement, EU nationals will now require a work permit to play in England - while previous rule caveat to the transfer rules which govern 16 to 18-year-olds and allowed them to switch between nations in the EU will be rendered defunct for teams in England.

That means Middlesbrough won’t be able to recruit youngsters from overseas as easily have they done in the past, and may focus clubs’ minds on developing local talent.

Several players have previously headed to Teesside. under that rule, but it could be much harder to navigate moving forward.

PREMIER LEAGUE EFFECT

Top flight clubs are also set to find there are extra hurdles in their way when it comes to bringing in players - which could in turn see them turn to lower league clubs to bring in domestic youngsters rather than overseas equivalents.

Boro have already seen some of their most promising youngsters pillaged by top flight sides in recent years, and that may only increase after Brexit.

FINANCES

This has been a concern for many clubs - and one which Burnley chairman Mike Garlick believes may come to fruition.

In an interview with the BBC, he suggested that Brexit could ‘threaten to make the widening inequality gap in our top division even worse’, meaning the chances of a club breaking into the top six could become even slimmer.

COULD THERE BE POSITIVES?

Former Cardiff boss Neil Warnock, however, feels Brexit could have some positive implications for teams in England.

“I can’t wait to get out of it, if I’m honest,” he said.

“I think we’ll be far better out of the bloody thing. In every aspect.

"Football-wise as well, absolutely. To hell with the rest of the world.”